Porthdinllaen Lifeboat

Gorsaf Bad Achub Porthdinllaen

Latest Shout

14th August 2016

At 10.55am Holyhead Coastguard requested that Porthdinllaen RNLI lifeboat should launch to assist a broken down pleasure craft.

The 20ft Bayliner type craft, called the Blue Moon, had two people on board and had suffered mechanical failure approximately 10 miles North of Porthdinllaen Point.
 
The Blue Moon, which had set off earlier in the morning from Portdinorwig for a leisurely fishing trip, had suffered a drive coupling failure on their inboard engine which was not repairable at sea. Weather conditions were sunny with calm seas and only a slight breeze.
 
Upon arrival, the volunteer lifeboat crew from Porthdinllaen passed over a tow line to the Blue Moon and upon arrival at Porthdinllaen Bay, the boat was placed on a safe mooring.
 
The lifeboat then returned to the boathouse and was refuelled and ready for service at 12.45pm.
 
Ken Fitzpatrick, Lifeboat Operations Manager at Porthdinllaen RNLI, said: 'The Blue Moon suffered an unavoidable breakdown due to the failure of the engine drive coupling and the only option was to request a tow back to Porthdinllaen.'

Lone fisherman rescued by Porthdinllaen lifeboat

A fisherman who had ventured out of Trefor beach in a rowing boat has been rescued by Porthdinllaen RNLI lifeboat.

The gentleman, who was on holiday in the area, had set out of Trefor beach in the morning, for a day's fishing off the local pier. By early afternoon, the weather had deteriorated, and with a force six easterly wind and swell building up, the fisherman contacted Holyhead Coastguard to request help.
 
Porthdinllaen RNLI all-weather lifeboat, the John D Spicer was lauched at 1.15 pm to search for the missing fisherman. Contact was made with the fisherman, and by working on the information given to them, the volunteer crew began the search. Within 25 minutes of launching, the lifeboat had located the fisherman and he was taken on board the lifeboat and, along with his dinghy, was taken back to Trefor Harbour.

Ken Fitzpatrick, Launch Operations Manager at Porthdinllaen said, 'It is important that whnever anybody sets out to sea, that they inform someone ashore of their intentions and what time they intend to return. Everyone who sets out to sea, for their own safety, should wear a lifejacket, have means of calling for help should they find themselves in any danger, their distress kit should include red distress flares, a basic marine VHF radio and ensure that everyone on board knows how to use them. Basic checks such as weather forecast and tide times are essential The crew did a fantastic job considering the poor visibility hampering the search and strong wind blowing the casualty further out to sea.'

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